Personal tools
Site News

Social media: Get in touch with Fire Emblem Wiki on Twitter, Facebook, or Discord! Or, to join our Skype chat, contact any active admin and ask to be added.
Coverage policy: Please read the proposed coverage policy, and contribute your thoughts and questions here.


NOTICE: If you borrow any content from Fire Emblem Wiki and reuse it elsewhere, you must credit us as the original source, under the terms of our licence. If you do not do so, we may ask you to remove the relevant content.

BS Fire Emblem: Archanea War Chronicles

From Fire Emblem Wiki, your source on Fire Emblem Wiki information. By Fans, for Fans.
Jump to: navigation, search
Archanea War Chronicles

Ss febs titlescreen.png
Title screen of BS Fire Emblem.
Developer(s)

Intelligent Systems

Publisher(s)

St.GIGA

Release date(s)

JPSeptember 28th, 1997[1]

Platform(s)

Super Famicom (Satellaview)

Predecessor

Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War

Successor

Fire Emblem: Thracia 776

(Japanese: BS ファイアーエムブレム アカネイア戦記編 BS Fire Emblem: Archanea War Chronicles Compilation), commonly called BS Fire Emblem, is a collection of four standalone Fire Emblem series maps for the Super Famicom, set in the Archanea universe before the beginning of Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light/Shadow Dragon and focusing on members of the games' cast other than Marth. The collection, usually counted as a single game, was playable only through the Satellaview satellite radio streaming add-on/service. The first broadcast of the collection's first episode took place on September 28, 1997; the collection's last broadcasts occurred in 1999.

The four BS Fire Emblem chapters were later remade as bonus content in Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Shadow, dubbed New Archanea War Chronicles; they are the only Satellaview titles to ever be rereleased in any form. The remakes omit many of the features unique to the originals and reframe the maps in the gameplay mechanics of the Nintendo DS remakes, also making adjustments to the number and type of enemies present in each.

Gameplay

Perhaps the most famous quality of the BS Fire Emblem chapters is that the games were, using the functionality of the Satellaview system, played alongside a streaming audio track featuring full voice acting for most of the cast. Every chapter opened and closed with a cutscene consisting of static picture panels accompanied by narration and voice acting. The game consists of two segments: the ROM containing the actual map and gameplay, and the streaming audio played alongside it including the soundtrack, new covers of tracks from Mystery of the Emblem. The former was saved onto a memory device, if intended to be done so temporarily, whereas the latter was not and is therefore permanently lost outside of recorded archive footage of the chapters being played, found on sites like YouTube and Nico Nico Douga.

The game uses the Fire Emblem: Mystery of the Emblem game engine, with a few modifications: the game features no battle animations and minimal written dialogue, the latter facilitated through the voice-acting. As in normal Fire Emblem games, each episode has one or two designated "Lord" characters who fulfill the normal purpose of a Lord: their death triggers a Game Over equivalent, where the map resets to where it was immediately after the previous voiced dialogue interlude (or, in modern attempts to emulate it, where said interlude would have been); they also act as an item convoy. During the game, if a player makes a mistake, they can press the L, R, Start and Select buttons in combination to restart the game from where it was at the time of the last voiced interlude.

In all episodes, the "victory" requirement is to survive the full broadcasting hour while gaining as many points as possible; points are earned by fighting and defeating enemies, opening chests and visiting villages. There is no seize point, and defeating the boss or routing all enemies does not end the episode; if either criteria is fulfilled, the episode will continue, spawning reinforcements every turn, until the ending cutscene. Any recruitable units are not recruited by talking to them; instead, they automatically join the player's army at fixed times in the playthrough, accompanied by audio discussing their decision to defect to the player.

At the broadcast's conclusion, each episode calculates a password from the player's score by the end. The purpose of the password was to be written down and sent in to ST.GIGA within a certain period following the episode's airing, in order to enter an unidentified contest.[2]

Accessing the games

Wikipedia.png
This article or section is a short summary of Satellaview.
Wikipedia features a more in-depth article.

The Satellaview was a satellite radio modem service for the Super Famicom, a joint venture between Nintendo and satellite radio company St.GIGA. The service streamed audio and visual content related to games and Nintendo, delivered by St.GIGA's satellite radio infrastructure: this included magazines, variety programmes, and sometimes entire Super Famicom games. One particular unique variety of game downloads via the service came in the form of SoundLink games: games set up to play alongside a radio streaming of audio specific to that game, often including voice-acting. Many of these games were more or less completely new installments in prominent Nintendo franchises. Games of this variety were prefixed with BS, a common Japanese abbreviation for "Broadcast Satellite"; another prominent example of this was BS The Legend of Zelda: Ancient Stone Tablets.

The menu for operating the Satellaview service was (Japanese: BS-X それは名前を盗まれた街の物語 BS-X : The Story of The Town Whose Name Has Been Stolen), a cartridge "game" BIOS/interface visually reminiscent of EarthBound. Programming of various types could be accessed from places in the town, sometimes taking the form of a new structure related to the game in question. For BS Fire Emblem, in the lead-up to the time of broadcast, the access point to the map of that night would appear in the Town in the form of a castle (oddly, the castle design used is from Genealogy of the Holy War). Once opened, the game would download and start playing at the correct predetermined time.

Episodes

Episode #1: Fall of the Palace
(Japanese: 第1話・パレス陥落 Fall of the Palace) Original broadcast date:
September 28th, 1997, 19:00-20:00[1]
Cm febs 1.png
"During the War of Shadows... The royal palace of Archanea, the largest kingdom in the continent, was in a truly hopeless situation, under the merciless onslaught of the Dolhrian army, led by the Shadow Dragon Medeus. As the footsteps of the imperial soldiers started resounding through the palace walls... King Archanea, with no other alternatives to consider, gave a secret order to the bishop Boah."
Playable units: Nyna, Boah, Midia, Tomas, Dolph, Macellan Boss: Gouber
Victory conditions: Survive the full broadcast playthrough
Defeat conditions: Nyna dies
Player: 6 Enemy: 13*


Episode #2: Crimson Dragoon
(Japanese: 第2話・赤い竜騎士 Crimson Dragoon) Original broadcast date:
October 5th, 1997, 19:00-20:00[1]
Cm febs 2.png
"Aurelis: a nation situated in the north-eastern plains of the continent. A verdant kingdom, sharing the deepest bonds with the Holy Kingdom of Archanea since its foundation. However, as a result of the aggressive attack of the Macedonian dracoknights led by Princess Minerva, Aurelis had already ceded most of its territory to the Dolhrian empire. As Princess Minerva returned to her post in Aurelis with her subordinates, a certain village caught her eye..."
Playable units: Minerva, Hardin, Catria, Est, Wolf, Roshea, Frost Boss: Ruben
Victory conditions: Survive the full broadcast playthrough
Defeat conditions: Minerva or Hardin die
Player: 7 Enemy: 20 *


Episode #3: Thieves of Justice
(Japanese: 第3話・正義の盗賊団 Thieves of Justice) Original broadcast date:
October 12th, 1997, 19:00-20:00[1]
Cm febs 3.png
"A few days after the Kingdom of Archanea fell and the royal palace with it... A man and a woman stepped foot in the palace town. The man's name was Rickard, and the woman was Lena."
Playable units: Rickard, Lena, Castor, Navarre, Malice, Dice Boss: Vaam
Victory conditions: Survive the full broadcast playthrough
Defeat conditions: Rickard dies
Player: 6 Enemy: 30


Episode #4: The Beginning
(Japanese: 第4話・始まりのとき The Beginning) Original broadcast date:
October 19th, 1997, 19:00-20:00[1]
Cm febs 4.png
"Two years have passed since the millenial palace was seized by Grust's Camus the Sable. Emperor Medeus of Dolhr ordered Camus to take full control of the palace. However Camus defied his orders, by continuing to shelter Princess Nyna. As time passed, Medeus lost his patience with Camus and ordered his men to take Nyna captive."
Playable units: Nyna, Camus, Roberto, Belf, Leiden Boss: Brzak
Victory conditions: Survive the full broadcast hour
Defeat conditions: Nyna or Camus die
Player: 5 Enemy: 30*


Broadcast dates

The BS Fire Emblem series was broadcast three times throughout the Satellaview's lifespan: its original airing in September-October 1997, and two series reruns in November-December 1997 and April-May 1999.[1] During a period in which it was being broadcast, each episode would be broadcast every night for a week at the same time every night, to be replaced with the next episode the following week.

Episode
Fall of the Palace Crimson Dragoon Thieves of Justice The Beginning
Original airing 09/28/1997 - 10/04/1997,
19:00-20:00
10/05/1997 - 10/11/1997,
19:00-20:00
10/12/1997 - 10/18/1997,
19:00-20:00
10/19/1997 - 10/25/1997,
19:00-20:00
Second airing 11/30/1997 - 12/06/1997,
18:00-19:00
12/07/1997 - 12/13/1997,
18:00-19:00
12/14/1997 - 12/20/1997,
18:00-19:00
12/21/1997 - 12/27/1997,
18:00-19:00
Final airing April ??, 1999,
??:??-??:??
April/May ??, 1999,
??:??-??:??
April/May ??, 1999,
??:??-??:??
May ??, 1999,
??:??-??:??

Characters

There are 23 playable characters across the four episodes; the only character to be playable in more than one episode is Nyna. Of these 23, six are completely new characters who were unique to this game until New Mystery of the Emblem; everyone else was playable in Mystery of the Emblem in some form. These new characters are as below:

Portrait Character Class Found in
Portrait frost febs.png Frost Bishop Episode 2
Portrait dice febs.png Dice Fighter Episode 3
Portrait malice febs.png Malice Mercenary Episode 3
Portrait belf febs.png Belf Cavalier Episode 4
Portrait roberto febs.png Roberto Horseman Episode 4
Portrait leiden febs.png Leiden Cavalier Episode 4

Archived broadcast content

Translated scripts

These scripts were translated by Kiddo, the owner of Satellablog, a blog extensively documenting the history and games of the Satellaview, from Japanese transcripts documented by this website, and were posted in this discussion thread on Serenes Forest.

Video footage

These are videos containing complete playthroughs of each chapter as they were originally presented, complete with the original voice acting, audio and cutscene slides. These were uploaded to YouTube by Kiddo, and were originally found on the Japanese video service NicoNico Douga.

Trivia

  • Traditionally, BS Fire Emblem is not counted as a "full" Fire Emblem series game and is skipped in naming schemes which refer to each game by number in release order (eg. Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light is "Fire Emblem 1", Gaiden is "Fire Emblem 2", etc). However, there was a brief period around the releases of New Mystery of the Emblem and Awakening in which Nintendo and Intelligent Systems counted BS Fire Emblem as the fifth game in the series and that the series consists of fourteen games in total.[3] Though this appears to have stopped, as the Japanese Fire Emblem World website's listing of games in the series now once again skips BS Fire Emblem and attests that there are thirteen games[4], the Iwata Asks for Fire Emblem Fates in both English and Japanese refers to Fates as the fifteenth entry in the series.[5] [6]
  • BS Fire Emblem has the lowest amount of representation of any Fire Emblem game in Awakening's SpotPass and DLC, with only one character originating from it featured: Malice.
  • The game's CG images, in addition to a separate piece of artwork for Midia, were illustrated by Rika Suzuki, who fifteen years later provided Seliph's DLC version artwork for Fire Emblem Awakening.[7]

Gallery

Etymology and other languages

Names, etymology and in other regions
Language Name Definition, etymology and notes
English
(unofficial)
BS Fire Emblem: Archanea War Chronicles
BS Fire Emblem: Archanea Saga
BS Fire Emblem: Record of Archanea Wars
Varying translations of the Japanese subtitle. "Archanea" and the European/Japanese name "Akaneia" are here used relatively interchangeably.
Japanese BS ファイアーエムブレム アカネイア戦記編 BS Fire Emblem: Archanea War Chronicles Compilation

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 サテラビュー歴史館: スーパーファミコンアワー番組表 (Japanese: Satellaview Museum - Super Famicom Hour Program Guide)
  2. Serenes Forest Forums: BS Fire Emblem Information
  3. Iwata Asks: Fire Emblem: Heroes of Light and Shadow (translated by Serenes Forest)
  4. ファイアーエムブレムワールド 【FIRE EMBLEM WORLD】: SERIES (Japanese)
  5. Iwata Asks: Fire Emblem If (Japanese)
  6. Iwata Asks: Fire Emblem Fates
  7. Wikipedia: 鈴木理華 (Japanese: Rika Suzuki)
Fire Emblem series
Main series Shadow Dragon and the Blade of LightGaidenMystery of the EmblemGenealogy of the Holy WarThracia 776The Binding BladeFire EmblemThe Sacred StonesPath of RadianceRadiant DawnAwakeningFatesFire Emblem for Nintendo Switch
Remakes Shadow DragonNew Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and ShadowEchoes: Shadows of Valentia
Other BS Fire Emblem: Archanea War ChroniclesMario Kart: Double Dash!! bonus discFire Emblem Heroes
Crossover games Super Smash Bros. MeleeSuper Smash Bros. BrawlSuper Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii UCode Name: S.T.E.A.M.Project X Zone 2Tokyo Mirage Sessions ♯FEFire Emblem Warriors
Versions and releases List of regional version differencesLocalization of the Fire Emblem series